DOT Makes Good with New DVIR Rule

Red Tape

In 2011, Obama made a directive that federal agencies aim to reduce the antiquated and ineffective rules on the private sector. The US Department of Transportation (DOT) has made a significant dent in the “overly-burdensome” task of unnecessary paperwork.

Today, “The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has rescinded the requirement that commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers operating in interstate commerce, except drivers of passenger-carrying CMV’s, submit, and motor carriers retain, Driver Vehicle Inspection Reports (DVIRs) when the driver has neither found nor been made aware of any vehicle defects or deficiencies. This rule also harmonizes the pre- and post-trip inspection lists. It responds in part to the President’s January 2011 Regulatory Review and Reform Initiative, removing a significant information collection burden without adversely impacting safety.”

The FMCSA approximates that roughly 46.7 million hours per year are spent on DVIRs that have no reporting value whatsoever. Only about 5% of driver inspections have need for reporting and this new No-Defect DVIR Rule allows that the remaining 95% of inspections turning up no issues no longer require reporting.

The DOT states that “America’s truckers should be able to focus more on getting their goods safely to store shelves, construction sites, or wherever they need to be instead of spending countless hours on unnecessary paperwork.”

DOT Briefing Room’s Anthony Foxx says, “During my confirmation hearing I pledged to act on the President’s unprecedented call to cut red tape and waste and today, DOT is proud to move the ball further toward that goal. I am proud that our achievement marks the Obama Administration’s largest paperwork reduction since the Regulatory Review and Reform initiative was announced. And we are not going to stop now. This is a far better way to do business.”

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Posted on January 7, 2015, in CMV, DOT, DVIR, FMCSA and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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